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Thursday, June 28, 2012

UN shifts from climate taxes to sustainability taxes

The UN’s Rio+20 Conference on Sustainable Development is finally over. CFACT was there from start to finish, in Rio de Janeiro and Belo Horizonte -- interviewing, educating, and working hard to defend the rights, liberties and opportunities of hard-working Americans and the billions of poor people who want to take their rightful places among the Earth’s healthy and prosperous inhabitants.

June 27, 2012

by PAUL DRIESSEN AND DUGGAN FLANAKIN

The Future We Want -- the theme of the UN's Rio+20 conference on sustainable development,  outlined a “common vision” for planetary “sustainable development,” as proclaimed by the “Organizing Partners of the Major Group of NGOs,” to guide the taxpayer-funded Rio+20 summit that ended last week in disarray and acrimony.

The activist organizations that cobbled the document together filled it with hundreds of platitudes and pseudo-solutions to global warming cataclysms, newly reconstituted as threats to resource depletion and biodiversity – and presented as standards and mandates for countries, communities and corporations.

The terms “sustainable development,” “sustainable” and “sustainability” appeared in the original text an astounding 390 times. Like “abracadabra,” these nebulous concepts were supposed to transform the world into a Garden of Eden global community, under United Nations auspices, that will use less, pollute less, and save species and planet from their worst enemy: humans.

To glean the document essence, however, readers only needed to understand two concepts: control and money – to impose the future the activists wanted.

The NGOs and UN called for “donations” from formerly rich European Union and Annex II (Kyoto Protocol) countries, at 0.7% of their gross national product per year. With the combined GNP of the contributing nations totaling about $45 trillion in 2010, the transfers would total $315 billion per year, or $3.2 trillion per decade.

Read the entire post from CFACT…


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